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2 edition of Voltammetric identification of dyes using surfactants found in the catalog.

Voltammetric identification of dyes using surfactants

Widdad Alwan Khdier

Voltammetric identification of dyes using surfactants

by Widdad Alwan Khdier

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Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis(M.Phil.)- Loughborough University of Technology.

Statementby Widdad A. Khdier.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13941818M

of C.I. Reactive Blue , nonionic surfactants, electrokinetic potential of dyeing bath Introduction Surfactants are commonly used in textile dyeing processes. Their use improves the quality of final dyeing. Interactions between dyes and surfactants in aqueous solutions . The introduction of the fibre reactive dyes, whilst presenting innovative ideas in both the chemistry and application of colorants, may be considered as a natural development from the first event. The third development can be related to the recognition of the potential adverse effects of certain synthetic dye intermediates on human : A.T. Peters.

Dyes and Pigments covers the scientific and technical aspects of the chemistry and physics of dyes, pigments and their intermediates. Emphasis is placed on the properties of the colouring matters themselves rather than on their applications or the system in which they may be applied. The present study describes the conductometric and spectroscopic study of the interaction of reactive anionic dyes, namely, reactive red and reactive orange with the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). In a systematic investigation, the electrical conductivity data was used to calculate various thermodynamic parameters such as free energy Cited by: 9.

Chemistry of dyes and principles of dyeing (Technology of textile processing) [Shenai, V. A] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Chemistry of dyes and principles of dyeing (Technology of textile processing)Author: V. A Shenai. Previous work has demonstrated that cointercalation of luminescent dyes and surfactants into layered double hydroxides (LDHs) is an efficient approach to inhibit the aggregation of dye and therefore enhance its photoluminescence behavior. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are .


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Voltammetric identification of dyes using surfactants by Widdad Alwan Khdier Download PDF EPUB FB2

A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Since when W.

Perkin synthesized the first synthetic dye (Mauveine), a wide variety of colors and shades are produced and used in several commercial products. The occurrence in water and wastewater has gained controversy regarding their toxicity and mutagenicity and it has been regulation by several regulatory agencies.

Thus, analytical methods able to determine these colorings in Cited by: 5. Surfactants are found in a wide variety of commercial products and environmental samples. Their identification is complicated due to the large number of commercially available surfactants, which are often complex mixtures.

Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is File Size: KB. water. The surfactants, SDS from Aldrich (USA), and CTAB from Prolabo (France) were prepared as a stock solution of ×10−2 molL−1/deionized water.

Electrochemical and spectroscopy instrumentation The voltammetric measurements were performed using a PC-controlled AEW2 electrochemistry workstation and data. Identification of Surfactants by Electrospray Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Schmidt’s surfactant series book lists a wide variety of information ion chromatography19 separations.

An especially novel separation method20 was noted for differentiating the classes of surfactants present in samples using dyes as ion pair Size: KB. Results of voltammetric analysis, pulse radiolysis measurements and GC–MS identification of intermediate products suggest two possible pathways of the dyes electrochemical oxidation.

Dyes and Surfactants. Marking dyes are used to locate placements of herbicides. The non-ionic surfactants are used with herbicides to achieve better coverage, causes the herbicide to stick to the plant, and allows deeper penetration of the herbicide to the weed.

electrochemical preliminary studies of Eosin-Y dye. By means of using the adsorptive stripping voltammetric method, a sensitive approach for the quantitative electro-analysis of this dye was achieved. A well-developed voltammetric peak probably related to the cathodic reduction of carbonyl group was obtained in pH (5) acetate buffer at mV.

for contamination of groundwater and drinking water supplies. So, detection, identification and degradation of reactive dyes are very important areas of study.

The aim of this study was, in a first approach, to investigate the voltammetric behavior of the two reactive dyes, using the cyclic voltammetry technique (CV) on a glassy carbon electrode.

In this study, the solubilization of two organic dyes, Sudan I (1-Phenylazonaphtol) and Quinizarin (1,4-Dihydroxyanthraquinone), was studied in the presence of different types of surfactants (2 polymerics, 2 nonionics, 2 anionic, and one cationic) using UV-Vis spectroscopy.

The electrochemical behaviour of these surfactants is characterized by an oxidation signal (peak or wave) situated before the electrolyte oxidation.

The anodic current is found to follow a linear relation with the concentration of the surfactants; the slope decreases abruptly above the critical micellar concentration (CMC) of the by: 7. Cyclic voltammetric studies The electrochemical measurements were carried out using an Electroanalyser, model(ChemiLink, Mumbai, India) controlled by electrochemical software.

A three electrodes system was used for the cyclic voltammetric experiments. The working electrode was a highly polished glassy carbon disc, with an effective. The possibilities of applying surfactants to the voltammetry of various biologically active compounds are generalized.

Attention is focused on micellar solutions and surfactant-modified electrodes in the determination of a number of organic compounds, including antioxidants. It is demonstrated that the use of surfactants makes it possible to improve analytical characteristics and, in some Cited by: Journal of Surfactants and Detergents Analysis of Surfactants: Part I John J.

Morelli 0 Gerald Szajer 0 0 Akzo Nobel Chemicals, Inc., Dobbs Ferry, New YorkUSA We present a comprehensive review of the literature devoted to the analysis of surfactants. The period covered is through Cited by: Pigment technology has developed tremendously in the past 15 years.

85% of the textile printing in the World is pigment book contains manufacturing process and other related details about Azine dyes, Azoic dyes, Azo dyes, Thiazole dyes, Triphenylmethane dyes, scientific classification of Vat dyes, fluorination of dyes, different.

Spectrophotometric determination of anionic surfactants in wastewater using photometry and extraction fluorometry using various dyes such as methylene blue, ethyl violet, rhodamine B, rhodamine 6G, safranine-T, acridine Anionic surfactants form complex with cationic dyes.

This complex is called ion-association by: John Oakes and Peter Gratton, Solubilisation of dyes by surfactant micelles. Part 2; Molecular interactions of azo dyes with cationic and zwitterionic surfactants, Cited by: Nur Syamimi et al: VOLTAMMETRIC ANALYSIS OF REACTIVE BLACK 5 DYE: INTERFERENCE STUDIES BY HEAVY METALS AND OTHER AZO DYES colours [1] whereas the reactive groups are covalently bonded with –OH or –NH 2 groups that present on the fibers to give excellent wash fastness property [2, 3].

Figure 1. Chemical structure of RB5File Size: KB. An electroanalytical method for the simultaneous detection and quantification of tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ) and butyl hydroxyanisole (BHA) in biodiesel was developed using a voltammetric technique and screen-printed supporting electrolyte solution was composed of Britton–Robinson buffer ( mol L −1) containing methanol (%) and the cationic surfactant Cited by: spectrometry.

The electrochemical behavior of these cardanol based azo dyes has been investigated by cyclic voltammetric technique by using sulfuric acid as supporting electrolyte. In addition, the effect of scan rate on dyes (2a – 2j) showed irreversible one step. Method comparison.

The accuracy of a newly developed or modified method can be assessed by comparing the results obtained using it with these obtained using a reference method of known accuracy and precision using a linear regression analysis.A reasonable number of samples (10–20) evenly spaced over a concentration range of interest must be analyzed by both the candidate method Cited by: of polyester using dry heat fixation technique!

5- However, some authors1S-ZI express the view that non-ionic surfactants have adverse influence on stability and colour yield, indicating an increase in the rate of crystallization and aggregation of some disperse dyes.

Although several mechanisms+ - .Natural Dyes: Sources, Chemistry, Application and Sustainability Issues Sujata Saxena and A. S. M. Raja Abstract Dyes derived from natural materials such as plant leaves, roots, bark, insect secretions, and minerals were the only dyes available to mankind for the coloring of textiles until the discovery of the first synthetic dye in RapidFile Size: KB.